Il Mercatino Giapponese in Rome: Should You Go? We'll Let You Know.

Il Mercatino Giapponese

Next Event: March 15, 2015 | Time: 10AM – 8PM

Blackout Club, Via Casilina 713, Rome (Zone: Tor Pignattarra)

If you take either the metro line A or B to Termini, then grab the 105 bus in the direction of Grotte Celoni or the tram line FC1, you will be able to arrive at the Mercatino Giapponese . (To plan your trip visit Rome’s transportation Pages: ATAC or MuoversiaRoma)

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Location Feature: Testaccio

Testaccio Market. Image by myVideoMedia. Click image to visit their blog.

Click per la versione italiana.

With each successive generation, there is a perceptible shift and perhaps distortion from the classic understanding of tourism.  Until a few decades ago, traveling meant settling on one major destination with all its bells and whistles.  This was, for a variety of reasons, in contrast to the prevalence of today’s do-it-yourself planning and the popularization of backpacking to contain costs and expand options for where to go and how much to see.

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Off the Beaten Path: 4 Museums in Rome You Should Know

Without a doubt, the city of Rome is a living museum, welcoming all to gaze upon the architectural and artistic wonders of bygone eras. Below are four museums that take you away from the crowds and offer you another immersive experience of its history:

1. Casa di Goethe

Casa di Goethe, Image by Martin Claßen. Click on image to visit their website.

Via del Corso 18 (Piazza del Popolo) Continue reading…

Valentine's Day in Rome: 3 Ways to Spend It!

If the Eternal City is par excellence and your love worthy of eternal promise, then being here on February 14th will be one day in which you cannot help but to get lost in they eyes of your partner as you wander through the streets of Rome.

Image by D. Blake

Image by Diedré Blake. Click to visit her site.

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Top 5 Reasons to Travel to Rome in the Low Season

With the holidays behind us, it’s fair to say that Rome has entered into its low season period.  Officially, the low season starts around November and lasts until March.

If you have ever visited Rome in November and December, then you already know that there is nothing low about those two months due to the winter holidays. Christmas, New Year’s, and the Epiphany all mean one thing here: lots of gift giving and celebrating with friends and family and, of course, time off from work.

Image by Deborah Sandidge. Click image to see more of her wonderful photos of Rome.

After the first week of January, the city tends to quieten; its streets are less flooded with human and vehicular traffic, and Italian can be heard more often than not in those places usually filled with tourists–which makes it the perfect time to actually visit the city and see the sites.

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Santa is gone, but the Befana is coming…

La Befana vien di notte  /  The Befana comes at night
Con le scarpe tutte rotte  /  In worn out shoes
Col vestito da romana  /  Dressed like a Roman
Viva viva la Befana!  /  Long live the Befana!

– An Italian Rhyme

Image from Samsonite Australia.

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For those who grew up in Rome, it may be hard to believe that this rhyme could be considered quite bizarre.  For most Romans, the Befana Rhyme creates a wonderful nostalgia for childhood, and paints colorful and beautiful images of the past.

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In Rome, Prepare for Christmas with the Tradition of the Nativity

If for many Christmas is symbolized by the fir tree, the tree decorations, and by the miniatures of a jolly but belabored Santa Claus climbing into chimneys with his massive bag of gifts, then for many others the symbol of Christmas is represented by a crib.

usa

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Essential Rome: 6 Things You Should Know Before You Go! (Part 2 of 2)

(Read Part 1)

This week we tackle three topics:

communication, dietary needs, and expat communities.

Traveling has its ups and downs.  For many, traveling is a positive and worry-free experience of visiting a new place and soaking up local culture.  For others, traveling can mean high dose of anxiety.  Still, visiting Rome doesn’t have to become a nightmare! There are many ways to navigate the Eternal to find exactly what you need.

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Piazza Santa Maria in Trastevere

Beyond arranging your flight and hotel, here are some essential ways to prepare for your stay in Rome.

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Muri Puliti, Popoli Muti: Walls, Graffiti & Roman Tradition

lutero

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Muri puliti, popoli muti (“clean walls, dumb people”) is a famous saying that has accompanied Rome’s long social and political history, extending beyond the walls of the beautiful capital to encapsulate a trend common to the entire Italian peninsula: graffiti.

The history of graffiti, or generally-speaking writing on walls, is not rooted in modern times.  Furthermore, the spontaneous practice of wall graffiti provides clear evidence of a population’s need to make openly make social commentary and explain concepts.  Italians call it scrittura di strada e di piazza (“street and piazza writing”), a means of communication, engaged in by various members of society from different social strata, that is equivalent and parallel to official and institutional forms.

Graffiti came to be seen as directly expressing popular thought, and covered a wide range of topics, many of which were incised into the walls of ancient Rome.  The curious passerby was treated to numerous graffiti that represented men, women, political caricatures, blatant erotic scenes infused with ritual and religion.

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The Other Roman Art: Our Top 5 Places to View Street Art

Leaving aside the politics of whether to call it street art or graffiti, 2014 was a great year for Rome’s alternative art scene.  Both Italian and international street artists have made the Eternal City their latest canvas for cultural and self-expression, and many of the city’s more residential neighborhoods.

In the recent years, websites that represent the street artist community, such as Street Art Roma, Street Art News, and 999 Contemporary Street Art, have emerged and are growing in popularity, giving new understanding to the art form by creating educational dialogue.

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