Is Giolitti (Gelateria) Worth It? We'll Tell You. :)

Gelato.   It’s the one Italian word I made sure I knew how to pronounce properly before my first visit to Rome. When I arrived I chucked my suitcase in my hotel room and then ran out the door like madwoman looking for the first gelato sign I could find–I was that serious about gelato.

Lactose free gelato, Giolitti. (Image by Diedré Blake.)

Lactose free gelato, Giolitti. (Image by Diedré Blake). Click to visit her site.

If you’re like me, then planning your trip to Rome (or while you are here) you’ve been looking into where you can get the best gelato.  Well, I have no answer for that, because it’s mostly all good to me.  But if you’ve been searching on TripAdvisor, then the name Giolitti  should already be familiar.

Giolitti’s is one of those places that gets a lot of hype, but is it worth all the hype it gets? So, I went to its very first location on Via del Vicario (there is another in EUR) to find out.  Continue reading…

Baths of Caracalla Revisited

Last fall, we featured one of our tour locations as a blog post: the Baths of Caracalla.  Perhaps not has popular as the Colosseum, Roman Forum or Vatican, the Baths of Caracalla remains a monumental and awe-inspiring structure. As we draw closer to the warmer spring weather, Mind the Guide invites you to take a look at our Rome tours, especially the Colosseum ad Baths of Caracalla Tour as well as the Underground Colosseum Tour.

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With this weather, there is one site that you should visit while you have the chance: The Baths of Caracalla (Le Terme di Caracalla).

The Baths of Caracalla, ~AD 216

The Baths of Caracalla, ~AD 216

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Thermal Baths: an opportunity when visiting Tuscany from Rome

Summer holidays are still far away, but that doesn’t mean you cannot enjoy warmth in the middle of winter. Why not take a day or 2-day trip from Rome to Viterbo and Siena?

Viterbo and Siena are just 2 hours or less away from Rome, and both provide the opportunity to submerge your body in hot natural thermal springs.

Click to visit Buzzing on the Web, and read their article 15 of the Most Beautiful Old Towns in the World."

Click to visit Buzzing on the Web, and read their article 15 of the Most Beautiful Old Towns in the World.”

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A Stop At Ex-J (Urban Wear in Rome)

Rome’s winter sales (saldi) continue and are a highlight of many travelers making their tour through Rome’s cobblestoned streets. With so many wonderful items on sale, the choices may seem endless–at least, that’s how I found it be while making my way to Giolitti on Via Uffici del Vicario.

Still, there was one store that caught my eye: EX-J.

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Essential Rome: 6 Things You Should Know Before You Go! (Part 1 of 2)

You’ve bought your ticket, packed and repacked your bags, have been crossing off the days on your calendar leading up to your departure date, and probably have been psyching yourself up for your trip by imagining touring the Vatican or the Colosseum.

But could it be that you’ve forgotten something?

Image by Dolores Juhas. Copyright (c) Dolores Juhas. All Rights Reserved. http://www.dolores-juhas.tk

Beyond arranging your hotel and flight, here are some essential ways to prepare for your stay in Rome.

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Muri Puliti, Popoli Muti: Walls, Graffiti & Roman Tradition

lutero

Click per la versione italiana

Muri puliti, popoli muti (“clean walls, dumb people”) is a famous saying that has accompanied Rome’s long social and political history, extending beyond the walls of the beautiful capital to encapsulate a trend common to the entire Italian peninsula: graffiti.

The history of graffiti, or generally-speaking writing on walls, is not rooted in modern times.  Furthermore, the spontaneous practice of wall graffiti provides clear evidence of a population’s need to make openly make social commentary and explain concepts.  Italians call it scrittura di strada e di piazza (“street and piazza writing”), a means of communication, engaged in by various members of society from different social strata, that is equivalent and parallel to official and institutional forms.

Graffiti came to be seen as directly expressing popular thought, and covered a wide range of topics, many of which were incised into the walls of ancient Rome.  The curious passerby was treated to numerous graffiti that represented men, women, political caricatures, blatant erotic scenes infused with ritual and religion.

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